Educational Excellence to Economic Prosperity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding aspirations, strengthening school governance, building leadership capacity, enhancing professional development, and encouraging collaboration and analysis… five deceptively simple priorities education experts believe will revolutionise secondary education in our region.

This is one of the key findings of one of the most comprehensive studies of Gisborn education ever conducted - Tairawhiti the Learning Region’s Education Excellence to Economic Prosperity.

The report, funded by ECT and developed over the past six months was recently released to the local education sector. It scopes issues within the local educational environment and develops a set of unique action points to revolutionise the way in which our young people learn.

The ‘CORE’ report, also commissioned by ECT in 2013, identified twenty one initiatives that they believed would address some of the real and perceived issues around education. This report further explores the options and identifies a clear way forward.

In unpacking the CORE recommendations, ECT's education change agent Lara Meyer reviewed masses of data from government agencies. She conducted 300 interviews with members of the community. We also set up a steering group of nine community members, representing business, the social sector, education, tertiary and local Iwi.

A variety of passionate, committed people have shared their ideas. All expressed a love for the region, their hopes for our children and the future, and a wish for everyone to lead a rich, full and healthy life.

But there was consensus that, at present, Tairawhiti has some real issues to address. We have to think outside the box, be courageous, work together as a community and do radical things. As a result the report identifies a series of new activities and prioritises some of the original activities from the CORE report.

Phase one priorities are about developing the ability of educators to deeply reflect on important information, build leadership and teaching capacity so that phase two initiatives, which require people to collaborate and strategise effectively, can happen.

For more information or a copy of the report, please email  y.berry@ect.org.nz

 

Understanding aspirations, strengthening school governance, building leadership capacity, enhancing professional development, and encouraging collaboration and analysis… five deceptively simple priorities education experts believe will revolutionise secondary education in our region. 

 

This is one of the key findings of one of the most comprehensive studies of Gisborne education ever conducted - Tairawhiti the Learning Region’s Education Excellence to Economic Prosperity.  

 

The report, funded by ECT and developed over the past six months was released to the local education sector last week. It scopes issues within the local educational environment and develops a set of unique action points to revolutionise the way in which our young people learn.  

 

The ‘CORE’ report, also commissioned by ECT in 2013, identified twenty one initiatives that they believed would address some of the real and perceived issues around education. Education change agent Lara Meyer says this report further explores the options and identifies a clear way forward. 

 

“In unpacking the CORE recommendations we reviewed masses of data from government agencies. We conducted 300 interviews with members of the community. We also set up a steering group of nine community members, representing business, the social sector, education, tertiary and local Iwi.  

 

“A variety of passionate, committed people have shared their ideas. All expressed a love for the region, their hopes for our children and the future, and a wish for everyone to lead a rich, full and healthy life,” she says. 

 

But there was consensus that, at present, Tairawhiti has some real issues to address. We have to think outside the box, be courageous, work together as a community and do radical things. As a result the report identifies a series of new activities and prioritises some of the original activities from the CORE report. 

 

Phase one priorities are about developing the ability of educators to deeply reflect on important information, build leadership and teaching capacity so that phase two initiatives, which require people to collaborate and strategise effectively, can happen,” she says

Understanding aspirations, strengthening school governance, building leadership capacity, enhancing professional development, and encouraging collaboration and analysis… five deceptively simple priorities education experts believe will revolutionise secondary education in our region. 

 

This is one of the key findings of one of the most comprehensive studies of Gisborne education ever conducted - Tairawhiti the Learning Region’s Education Excellence to Economic Prosperity.  

 

The report, funded by ECT and developed over the past six months was released to the local education sector last week. It scopes issues within the local educational environment and develops a set of unique action points to revolutionise the way in which our young people learn.  

 

The ‘CORE’ report, also commissioned by ECT in 2013, identified twenty one initiatives that they believed would address some of the real and perceived issues around education. Education change agent Lara Meyer says this report further explores the options and identifies a clear way forward. 

 

“In unpacking the CORE recommendations we reviewed masses of data from government agencies. We conducted 300 interviews with members of the community. We also set up a steering group of nine community members, representing business, the social sector, education, tertiary and local Iwi.  

 

“A variety of passionate, committed people have shared their ideas. All expressed a love for the region, their hopes for our children and the future, and a wish for everyone to lead a rich, full and healthy life,” she says. 

 

But there was consensus that, at present, Tairawhiti has some real issues to address. We have to think outside the box, be courageous, work together as a community and do radical things. As a result the report identifies a series of new activities and prioritises some of the original activities from the CORE report. 

 

Phase one priorities are about developing the ability of educators to deeply reflect on important information, build leadership and teaching capacity so that phase two initiatives, which require people to collaborate and strategise effectively, can happen,” she says

 

Understanding aspirations, strengthening school governance, building leadership capacity, enhancing professional development, and encouraging collaboration and analysis… five deceptively simple priorities education experts believe will revolutionise secondary education in our region. 

 

This is one of the key findings of one of the most comprehensive studies of Gisborne education ever conducted - Tairawhiti the Learning Region’s Education Excellence to Economic Prosperity.  

 

The report, funded by ECT and developed over the past six months was released to the local education sector last week. It scopes issues within the local educational environment and develops a set of unique action points to revolutionise the way in which our young people learn.  

 

The ‘CORE’ report, also commissioned by ECT in 2013, identified twenty one initiatives that they believed would address some of the real and perceived issues around education. Education change agent Lara Meyer says this report further explores the options and identifies a clear way forward. 

 

“In unpacking the CORE recommendations we reviewed masses of data from government agencies. We conducted 300 interviews with members of the community. We also set up a steering group of nine community members, representing business, the social sector, education, tertiary and local Iwi.  

 

“A variety of passionate, committed people have shared their ideas. All expressed a love for the region, their hopes for our children and the future, and a wish for everyone to lead a rich, full and healthy life,” she says. 

 

But there was consensus that, at present, Tairawhiti has some real issues to address. We have to think outside the box, be courageous, work together as a community and do radical things. As a result the report identifies a series of new activities and prioritises some of the original activities from the CORE report. 

 

Phase one priorities are about developing the ability of educators to deeply reflect on important information, build leadership and teaching capacity so that phase two initiatives, which require people to collaborate and strategise effectively, can happen,” she says